Quilcene National Fish Hatchery centennial is Saturday

by Tim Flanagan on August 19, 2011

Jeff Hodson has the story in the Seattle Times:

check just north of Seward Park. ” alt=”Friends of a 21-year-old Seattle man who fell off a personal watercraft Wednesday evening look on as Seattle Police search for his body Thursday morning on Lake Washington, this just north of Seward Park. ” align=”right” src=”http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/ABPub/2011/08/18/2015945847.jpg” width=”296″ height=”168″ />[Friends of a 21-year-old Seattle man who fell off a personal watercraft Wednesday evening look on as Seattle Police search for his body Thursday morning on Lake Washington, about it just north of Seward Park.  KEN LAMBERT / THE SEATTLE TIMES]

A 21-year-old Seattle man fell off a personal watercraft Wednesday evening into the choppy waters of Lake Washington and was presumed drowned.

The man was driving a motorized Yamaha WaveRunner when he fell off the boat about 6:30 p.m. north of Seward Park. A nearby boater threw a life jacket to the man, but the man could not reach it, according to Seattle police and fire authorities.

The boater jumped into the water and was able to grab the man’s hand, but the 21-year-old old couldn’t hold on, officials said.

"He was a very good swimmer," Seattle Fire Department spokesman Kyle Moore said, after speaking with the 21-year-old’s family. "He was out there with a friend."

The man was not wearing a life vest, Moore said.

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This unsigned story appears in the Port Townsend Leader:

The main Quilcene National Fish Hatchery compound in 1934. The facility now includes 39 raceways, <a href=here
each 8 feet wide and 80 feet long, and three water intake structures – two on the Big Quilcene River and one on Penny Creek. Visit the facility for a special centennial celebration on Saturday, Aug. 20.” src=”http://www.ptleader.com/SiteImages/Article/29849a.jpg” width=”350″ />
[The main Quilcene National Fish Hatchery compound in 1934. The facility now includes 39 raceways, each 8 feet wide and 80 feet long, and three water intake structures – two on the Big Quilcene River and one on Penny Creek. Visit the facility for a special centennial celebration on Saturday, Aug. 20.]

Celebrate the Quilcene National Fish Hatchery’s centennial from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 20. Park in Quilcene and take a shuttle bus to the hatchery. Admission is free. Submitted photo
[Celebrate the Quilcene National Fish Hatchery’s centennial from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 20. Park in Quilcene and take a shuttle bus to the hatchery. Admission is free.]

In 1911, when the Quilcene National Fish Hatchery first opened its doors, William Howard Taft was president, naval aviation was in its infancy, a dozen eggs cost 23 cents, and Peru’s Machu Picchu had just been rediscovered.

A century later, on Aug. 20, 2011, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., the hatchery celebrates 100 years of programs. Celebration attendees have the opportunity to tour the hatchery, see inside a state-of-the-art automated fish-marking trailer capable of marking more than 8,000 young fish per hour, listen to storytellers, make artistic fish prints using the Japanese art of gyotaku and learn more about Pacific salmon through hands-on activities.

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