Drinking aboard in B.C.? Better check the rules first

by Tim Flanagan on June 28, 2010

KING5 has this story:


Credit: KING

SEATTLE – A woman has died after being hit on the head by a construction crane on a barge in Seattle’s Elliott Bay.

The accident happened just before 11 a.m. in the 1300 block of Alaskan Way.

Firefighters found the woman, drugs in her late 30s, with head injuries. Firefighters used an extended ladder, ropes and rescue basket to lift the woman from the barge. She was given CPR and transported to Harborview Medical Center.

A hospital spokesperson says the woman died shortly after she arrived.

It’s unclear how the accident happened or what the woman was doing on the barge.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Coast Guard announced Friday an unexpected engine casualty aboard Coast Guard Cutter Polar Sea, decease
one of the service’s three polar icebreakers, viagra 60mg
will prohibit the icebreaker from getting underway for its fall 2010 Coast Guard Arctic patrol and will most likely keep the cutter from providing standby capability for Operation Deep Freeze to support the resupply of McMurdo Station, Antarctica.

Polar Sea will likely be in a maintenance status and unavailable for operations until at least January 2011.

The Coast Guard’s other heavy, polar icebreaker, the Polar Star, is in the process of being reactivated for service, but will not be ready until 2013.  The Coast Guard Cutter Healy, a medium polar icebreaker, remains operational.

Inspections of the Polar Sea’s main diesel engines revealed premature excessive wear in 33 cylinder assemblies.  A root cause failure analysis to determine the underlying cause of the excessive wear is underway and expected to be complete in August.

The Polar Sea was commissioned into service on Feb. 23, 1978, and has exceeded its intended 30-year life; in 2006 the Coast Guard completed a rehabilitation project that extended its service life to 2014.  The Polar Star was placed in a caretaker status in 2006 and is currently completing a seven to 10 year, service life, extension project that is expected to return it to an operational status in early 2013.

The Healy is capable of conducting a wide range of Coast Guard missions in the Polar Regions including supporting scientists working in the Arctic.  The Healy is the most technologically advanced polar icebreaker in the fleet.  

Rachel Pritchett has the story in the Kitsap Sun:

Revenues at the Port of Bremerton are running at 11 percent behind projections, seek and the port is answering by cutting expenses and putting off projects.

“We’re very much influenced by this recession, remedy ” said Chief Executive Officer Cary Bozeman.

“Today the job is to manage relative to this economy and don’t spend money we don’t have, case and to make the decisions to cut early in the year before the problem gets too severe,” he said.

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Three Sheets Northwest has this item:

Crabbing, <a href=sovaldi salmon fishing light up for Fourth of July weekend” src=”http://threesheetsnw.com/wp-content/themes/newsport/thumb.php?src=http://threesheetsnw.com/files/2010/06/crab3.jpg&h=300&w=450&zc=1&q=90″ width=”450″ height=”300″ />

If you’ve been anxiously awaiting the start of crabbing season, approved
the wait’s almost over — seven areas of Puget Sound open for Dungeness crabbing on July 1.

Those include marine areas 6 (Eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca), this web
8-1 (Deception Pass/Skagit Bay), 8-2 (Port Susan/Port Gardner), 9 (Admiralty Inlet), 10 (Seattle/Bremerton), 11 (Tacoma/Vashon) and 12 (Hood Canal). The crab fishery in those areas opens at 7 a.m. July 1 and is open Wednesday through Saturday each week, plus the entire Labor Day weekend.

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Deborah Bach has the story at Three Sheets Northwest:

Drinking aboard in B.C.? Better check the rules first
[Deborah Bach | Three Sheets Northwest: Galley? Stateroom? Head? In that case, allergist
imbibe.]

If you’re like many Puget Sound boaters, healing
you might be planning a trip north to cruise the waters of British Columbia this summer.

But if those plans could include having a beer while crabbing in your dinghy or enjoying a glass of wine in your daysailer, you might want to think twice.

Under B.C. law, alcohol can only be consumed in a boat that’s equipped with living facilities and is either at anchor or moored to a dock. In other words, unless your boat has permanent sleeping facilities, a galley and a permanent toilet, adult beverages onboard are verboten. If you’re caught, you could have your liquor seized and be slapped with a $230 ticket.

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