Canadian environmentalists in court to extend protection for killer whales

by Tim Flanagan on June 14, 2010

Dean Rutz has this article in the Seattle Times:

information pills but Todd is building new boats for Washington State Ferries. ” alt=”Todd Shipyards: The Quinault sits in dry dock at Todd Shipyards' Harbor Island facility in this 2007 photo. The old Steel Electric ferry has since been sold for scrap, infection but Todd is building new boats for Washington State Ferries. ” align=”right” src=”http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/ABPub/2010/06/11/2011779132.jpg” width=”296″ height=”320″ />[Dean Ruts photo: The Quinault sits in dry dock at Todd Shipyards’ Harbor Island facility in this 2007 photo. The old Steel Electric ferry has since been sold for scrap, this web but Todd is building new boats for Washington State Ferries.]

Founded: 1916
Headquarters: Seattle
Major operations: Seattle, Everett
CEO: Stephen Welch
Employees: 550
Major products/services: Shipbuilding and repair, for both military and commercial vessels
Special sauce: It’s hard to argue with nearly a century of experience.

Business at this venerable Seattle shipbuilding and repair company ebbs and flows like the tide, though a lot less predictably.

Todd relies for much of its business on contracts with the U.S. government, mainly the Navy and Coast Guard. Its core deal is a renewable five-year contract for non-nuclear repair and maintenance work on the Navy’s aircraft carriers stationed in Puget Sound.

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Judith Lavoie  of the Canwest News Service has this item in the Province:

VICTORIA — Environmental groups will be in court this week arguing the federal government is failing to adequately protect critical habitat for endangered and threatened pods of killer whales.
Ecojustice lawyer Margot Venton is asking the Federal Court of Canada for a judicial review, urologist
claiming the government is acting unlawfully by interpreting critical habitat only as physical space, prescription
instead of ensuring there is salmon for the whales to eat, approved
the water is not overly polluted and whales are not subjected to excessive noise.
“The reason that this is critical habitat is that the areas are natural funnels for migrating salmon — that is why the whales are there,” said Venton, who is acting for the David Suzuki Foundation, Dogwood Initiative, Environmental Defence Canada, Greenpeace Canada, International Fund for Animal Welfare, Raincoast Conservation Society, Sierra Club of Canada and Western Canada Wilderness Committee.
Declines in chinook salmon runs, together with chemical pollution and noise in the ocean that makes it difficult for whales to echolocate prey, have been identified as affecting the survival of the endangered southern resident killer whales and the threatened northern resident pods.

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