Derelict vessels pollute waterways

by Tim Flanagan on September 24, 2009

OH Canada! Well no, dentist not really…but at this time I can see Canada on one side of the boat and the U.S. on the other. Multiple recreational vessels are scattered about in the vast waters in between enjoying the calm waters and blue skies. Although Sunday may be a day off for many, hospital for the crew on board the Fir it is just another day at work. Meals are still needing to be made for the hungry crew, rounds through the engine room to ensure everything is working properly and of course little bits of daily maintenance (making sure the boat is clean, tidy and fit for sea).

No buoys to be worked on today. Today the crew is working on LE (law enforcement), which consists of boarding fishing vessels to ensure that everything on board is up to date and within regulations. The crew is also working on whats called BECCES (basic engineering casualty control exercise). In essence, it is training exercises for the crew to prepare them in case of an emergency. You know, when the ‘stuff’ hits the fan? That sort of thing. It’s pretty stressful because everything is simulated like it was really happening. From what I have been hearing and seeing, everything is doing really well. They have also been conducting fire drills. Simulating a fire with a smoke machine and such while the crew dons fire PPE and ‘extinguishes’ the out of control flames.

I apologize for not blogging in the last couple of days. I have an excuse, so hear me out. Well first of all a few days ago I was dead to the world. Seriously. The seasickness finally caught up to me and showed me what it was made of. I think I was out for a good day and a half…and I totally lost track of time and what day it was. A BIG thank you to HS2 Miller for being my saving grace!

Secondly, we are in a strange ‘in between’ with Canada on one side and the U.S. on the other. Depending on where the boat is, we will float into an international call zone and sometimes we just lose connection completely. (that is also because of the training exercises going on)

Aside from praying to the porcelain god while I was sick, this trip has been a really good experience for me. Last night was pizza night for the crew. In the week that I have been on board I had NOT seen the messdeck as packed as I did when pizza, wings, chessesticks and other goodness was being served. I am a glutton for pizza and apparently so is the crew…we had our fill. After filling our bellies, many of the crewmembers and myself piled into ‘crew lounge’ and watched Transporter 3 and The Proposal. (great movie btw) We could not stop laughing. It was really nice to see everyone let loose, just laugh and have a good time.

Eventually, most of the crew headed off to their racks to tuck in for the night. I took the opportunity to head up to the bridge and chat with the XO (Lt. Waters), YN2 Thompson and BM2 Shores while they were on watch. It’s pitch dark outside with the exception of thousands of stars littering the night sky and a half moon pouring its light onto the water like a trail of golden paint. Living in a big city like Seattle, I forget how incredibly beautiful it is on the open water. I can barely make out the faces of the Coasties I am speaking to. Their faces are only slightly illuminated by the dim red lights of the radar screens.

I talk to them for about an hour asking questions for my feature story but most of the conversation is us joking around and possibly them teasing me on my little to no knowledge of cutter information. It’s done in a friendly jest….I hope. hahahaha

But in all seriousness, I have felt like I have been made part of the crew. It is hard for me as a PA sometimes. My job is to document the Coast Guard mission and highlight the people who work their butts off everyday ensuring that our mission is done and done well. But sometimes I feel as though as I am slightly invading a territory. Everyone here is pretty tight knit and looks out for one another. For me to just come in for a week or two and try to gain access to personal sides to people in photos, video and stories usually takes time, patience and trust. It is a delicate balance I must understand and be conscious of. If people do not open up right away I must respect that and be gentle for I am here to tell their story and help them to understand.

Hopefully that wasn’t just me rambling but I think you get the point. I truly enjoy what I do and the people I’ve met and experiences that I have had in doing this are some that I will never forget.

Wow. I didn’t mean to get all sentimental on you guys but it happens sometimes. I don’t know why, but the photo thing isn’t letting me post any photos right now so I shall post more tomorrow. Happy Sunday everyone! Meatball subs and beef stroganoff for lunch today.

Oh and P.S. USC won yesterday! :)

-PA3 Molle

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Barnstable Patriot
Music on Cape Cod Sept. 24 – Oct. 1
Cape Cod Times
Fall for Harwich concert, 7:30 pm Saturday, Pilgrim Congregational Church, Route 28, Harwich Port. Features Larry Marsland, baritone, with pianist
What's happening on Cape – Sept. 25 – Oct. 1Cape Cod Times



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Coho, pink salmon catch remains hot in Puget Sound
Seattle Times
Pink fishing slowed down in the Strait of Juan de Fuca from Sekiu to Port Angeles, but the coho action is good. "The pink catch has gone down, but there are

and more »

A series of meetings is scheduled around Washington state in September and October to discuss fishing regulations that would be in effect for a two-year period.

The proposed rules would impact various freshwater and saltwater recreational fisheries around the state during the 2010-2012 sportfishing season; annual regulations will continue for salmon, recipe
halibut and coastal groundfish.

The proposed rules are available on the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife’s (WDFW) website. Printed copies are available by contacting WDFW’s Fish Program at 360.902.2700.

Anyone with an interest in the sportfishing season is encouraged to submit comments about the regulations, salve
said Craig Burley, fish division manager for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife.

“For cost-saving measures, the department is adopting recreational sportfishing rules on a two-year cycle rather than on a yearly basis, which means the next opportunity to change these rules will be for the 2012-14 season,” Burley said.

The meetings will start at 6 p.m. at all locations except Port Angeles, where the meeting will start at 6:30 p.m. The meetings are scheduled for:

  • Sept. 28 – WDFW’s Ephrata office, 1550 Alder St. N.W., Ephrata
  • Sept. 29 – WDFW’s Spokane office, 2315 North Discovery Place, Spokane Valley
  • Sept. 30 – Carpenter’s Hall, 507 Third St., Yakima
  • Oct. 6 – WDFW’s Mill Creek office, 16018 Mill Creek Blvd., Mill Creek
  • Oct. 7 – Peninsula College, 1502 E. Lauridsen Blvd., Room J47, Port Angeles
  • Oct. 8 – WDFW’s Vancouver office, 2108 Grand Blvd., Vancouver
  • Oct. 13 – WDFW headquarters, Natural Resources Building, Room 172, 1111 Washington St. S.E., Olympia

People attending the meetings will have an opportunity to discuss the proposals with WDFW staff and submit written comments. Comments also can be submitted by mail to WDFW Rules Coordinator Lori Preuss at preuslmp@dfw.wa.gov or 600 Capitol Way N., Olympia, WA, 98501. All written comments must be received by Nov. 7.

The public also will have an opportunity to provide testimony and written comments on the proposed rule changes during the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission’s Nov. 6-7 meeting in Olympia. Check the commission’s website for the specific day and time.

The commission, which sets policy for WDFW, is scheduled to vote on the final sportfishing rules package during its February 2010 meeting.

Sportfishing rules currently under consideration include:

  • Requiring the use of single-point, barbless hooks for salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River from the mouth of the river to McNary Dam
  • Coordinating the season and slot limit for divers and anglers harvesting lingcod
  • Protecting streams that act as nurseries for juvenile anadromous fish
  • Prohibiting the harvest of all species of unclassified marine fish and invertebrates
  • Reducing the daily limit of Dungeness crab in all areas of Puget Sound to four and changing the harvest schedule to Fridays through Mondays in marine areas 6, 7, 8-1, 8-2, 9, 10, 11 and 12
  • Developing a set of protective measures for rockfish
  • Changing the definition of the anti-snagging rule
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TIME, DATE, PLACE | Kitsap Happenings for the Week Sept. 18-24
North Kitsap Herald
'WHALES IN OUR MIDST:' The Bainbridge Island Historical Museum features a new exhibit “Killer Whales in The Salish Sea” this month, covering the Native

and more »

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pink salmon catch remains hot in Puget Sound
Seattle Times
Pink fishing slowed down in the Strait of Juan de Fuca from Sekiu to Port Angeles, but the coho action is good. "The pink catch has gone down, but there are

and more »

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sans-serif”>
Coho, pink salmon catch remains hot in Puget Sound
Seattle Times
"When you think of salmon your first thought is a river or stream, so it was a very interesting [out on Puget Sound]," said Beckham, who has done a lot of
Pink fishing winding down, but coho picking up slackThe Olympian


Humpies make landing a coho difficultHeraldNet
Pink bite in Puget Sound slowing down, but coho are coming in strongSeattle Times

all 7 news articles »

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TIME, DATE, PLACE | Kitsap Happenings for the Week Sept. 18-24
North Kitsap Herald
'WHALES IN OUR MIDST:' The Bainbridge Island Historical Museum features a new exhibit “Killer Whales in The Salish Sea” this month, covering the Native

and more »

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DATE, PLACE | Kitsap Happenings for the Week Sept. 18-24
North Kitsap Herald
KINGSTON FARMERS MARKET: Is located at Mike Wallace Park at the Port of Kingston Marina from 9 am to 2 pm each Saturday through October.

and more »

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sans-serif”>
Coho, pink salmon catch remains hot in Puget Sound
Seattle Times
"When you think of salmon your first thought is a river or stream, so it was a very interesting [out on Puget Sound]," said Beckham, who has done a lot of
Pink fishing winding down, but coho picking up slackThe Olympian


Pink bite in Puget Sound slowing down, but coho are coming in strongSeattle Times

all 7 news articles »

mind sans-serif”>
TIME, DATE, PLACE | Kitsap Happenings for the Week Sept. 18-24
North Kitsap Herald
KINGSTON FARMERS MARKET: Is located at Mike Wallace Park at the Port of Kingston Marina from 9 am to 2 pm each Saturday through October.

and more »

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DATE, PLACE | Kitsap Happenings for the Week Sept. 18-24
North Kitsap Herald
'WHALES IN OUR MIDST:' The Bainbridge Island Historical Museum features a new exhibit “Killer Whales in The Salish Sea” this month, covering the Native

and more »

The DNR’s Ear to the Ground blog has this story. But heck, tadalafil
this list doesn’t even include the wreck I spotted this summer!

derelictvessel

A big thanks to KOMO 4 News and the Seattle PIfor yesterday’s news video and article about the many derelict vessels littering and, sale
in several cases, and
polluting our state’s waterways. DNR administers the state’s Derelict Vessel Removal Program, and works with local governments — and the owners — to remove these rotting relics. See DNR’s 10-page list (!) of derelict vessels awaiting action — OK, it’s doublespaced but it still has close to 200 vessels, some up to 200-feet in length and containing diesel, motor oil, solvents, hydraulic fluids, battery acid… you get the idea.

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